Sunday, 26 April 2015

Ascension Earth 2012 -- 26:04:2015

Ascension Earth 2012


  • Are All Violent Criminals Meat Eaters? Vegan Activist Makes Intriguing Points on Israeli Television
  • Moon and Jupiter Rendezvous This Weekend: How to See Them
  • Astronomers locate 11 Galaxies facing Lonely Future
  • Experts Denounce Practice of Human Gene Modification
  • Mystery of the dust storms sweeping the world
  • 7.9 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Nepal; devastating loss of people, history ~ Video
  • Where Did Humans Come From? With Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • The 'Why the F*** Are We So Fat?!' 30 Day Experiment' Day 6 ~ Finishing
  • The Definitive Guide to Your Home - the Milky Way Galaxy
  • How Can Galaxies Move Faster than Lightspeed? ~ Ask the Experts #25
  • Separation of Powers and Checks and Balances: Crash Course Government and Politics #3
Posted: 25 Apr 2015 07:30 PM PDT


Animal Rights Activist Gary Yourofsky

*The title of this video is unfair to the interviewer/reporter, though the intriguing points made by Gary Yourofsky make it a must see presentation.
Posted: 25 Apr 2015 07:12 PM PDT

 



Excerpt from space.com


On Saturday and Sunday, you can finish the day by stepping outside and enjoying a view of the rendezvous of two of the brightest objects in the night sky — the moon and the planet Jupiter.

About 45 minutes after the sun sets on both nights, the eye-catching celestial duo will be visible in the southwest sky, roughly two-thirds of the way up from the horizon to the point directly overhead (called the zenith).

The moon will officially reach first-quarter phase on Saturday evening (April 25) at 7:55 p.m. EDT (2355 GMT). The terminator — the line separating the light half of the moon (on the right) from the dark half — will appear perfectly straight, and Jupiter will be about 9 degrees above and to the left of the moon's left. (Reminder: Your clenched fist held at arm's length measures about 10 degrees.)

 On Sunday evening (April 26), the two celestial bodies will be just 8 degrees apart. But on that day, the moon will be in a waxing gibbous phase and will be situated to the lower left of Jupiter.

Even without the moon, Jupiter readily attracts attention: At about magnitude minus 2.1, the gas giant outshines everything in the night sky except Venus and the moon. These days, Jupiter first comes into view high in the southwest during the early stages of twilight and sets at around 2:45 a.m. local daylight time.1




In a telescope, Jupiter is a prime attraction, best observed during early evening when it's still high and its image reasonably calm. The giant planet appears as a great, big, belted ball showing tantalizing glimpses of detail. Admittedly, Jupiter currently appears only 75 percent as big as it did at opposition in early February, but don't let that stop you from searching for the planet. The quirks of atmospheric conditions, which can change from minute to minute, often make a bigger difference in what a telescope will show of Jupiter than does the planet's apparent size.  And Jupiter's four bright Galilean moons (Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa) are always performing.

Finally, take note of this: Jupiter is now just two months away from a spectacularly close conjunction with Venus, which will occur on July 1.

Posted: 25 Apr 2015 07:06 PM PDT






Excerpt from uncovercalifornia.com

It’s a first for researchers to have discovered a number of runaway galaxies that managed to find a place away from their original homes. The galaxies have been thrown away from their galactic clusters because of gravitational turbulence. Discovery News has reported that 11 homeless galaxies have been identified by Igor Chilingarian, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Moscow State University, and his fellow astronomers.
They stumbled upon the discovery while reviewing publicly available data collected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the GALEX satellite for compact elliptical galaxies.
“These galaxies are facing a lonely future, exiled from the galaxy clusters they used to live in”, said Chilingarian. Findings of the new discovery have been published in the paper in the journal Science.


Chilingarian and Zolotukhin said that their original goal was to identify new members of a class of galaxies known as compact elliptical. These are small groups of stars larger then star clusters, but not larger than typical galaxies. They managed to identify nearly 200 previously unknown compact ellipticals. Of them, 11 were lonely and were located at a good enough distance from any clusters.
The discovery left the researchers surprised, given the previous elliptical that had been found were all located in clusters. The newly found galaxies were learnt not to be isolated only, but moving at a pace faster than those in clusters.
The researchers were of the belief that the reason behind the small size of these galaxies was them being stripped of their stars by other larger galaxies.
According to Chilingarian and Zolotukhin, an object becomes a runaway after attaining traveling speed faster than escape velocity, which does not allow it to ever return to its place of origin.
Posted: 25 Apr 2015 07:04 PM PDT






Excerpt from biotechwired.com

The news that Chinese scientists have modified the genes of human embryos have caused much stir across the world with researchers criticizing the approach and calling for denouncing the practice. The study was publised on April 18 in the journal Protein & Cell. It shows that they made use of  a genetic engineering technique that is called CRISPR in order to cut out a faulty gene and replace it with a healthy one in human embryos. This technique has the potential of permanently altering human DNA and the changes would be passed to several generations.


“This news emphasises the need for an immediate global ban on the creation of GM designer babies,” said Human Genetics Alert Director, Dr David King.


“It is critical that we avoid a eugenic future in which the rich can buy themselves a baby with built-in genetic advantages.


“It is entirely unnecessary since there are already many ethical ways to avoid thalassaemia. This research is a classic example of scientific careerism – assuring one’s place in the history books even though the research is unnecessary and unethical.”


The team used a gene-editing technique that is known as CRISPR/Cas9 that was discovered by scientists as MIT. This practice was severely criticized by some researchers.


Prof Shirley Hodgson, Professor of Cancer Genetics, St George’s University of London, said: “I think that this is a significant departure from currently accepted research practice. Can we be certain that the embryos that the researchers were working on were indeed non-viable?


“Any proposal to do germline genetic manipulation should be very carefully considered by international regulatory bodies before it should be considered as a serious research prospect.”


“Their study should give pause to any practitioner who thinks the technology is ready for testing to eradicate diseasegenes during IVF. This is an unsafe procedure and should not be practiced at this time, and perhaps never”, said George Q Daley, a stem cell researcher at Harvard, referring to in vitro fertilization.
Posted: 25 Apr 2015 06:59 PM PDT


In December a small town in Queensland, Australia, experienced a dust storm (pictured) that residents said was unprecedented in magnitude 




Excerpt from dailymail.co.uk

Experts baffled by spate of 'haboobs' which have brought travel chaos and turned day into night in cities thousands of miles from deserts 


  • Footage showed an unusual 'apocalyptic' dust storm hitting Belarus
  • China has suffered four massive sandstorms since the start of the year 
  • Half of dust in atmosphere today is due to human activity, said Nasa 

This year has seen a rash of massive dust storms around the world that have led to travel chaos and blocked out sunlight - but experts cannot pinpoint the reason behind the spate.
This week incredible footage showed the moment an unusual 'apocalyptic' dust storm, known in Arabic as a haboob, struck Belarus, turning day to night, and China has suffered four massive sandstorms since the start of the year.
Some experts have said that climate change bringing excessive heat can make some areas more susceptible to dust storms, but one European scientist pointed out that the number of dust storms over the decades has always been variable.
Dark clouds start forming over the city of Soligorsk, Belarus, as a sandstorm sweeps over the city

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Dark clouds start forming over the city of Soligorsk, Belarus, as a sandstorm sweeps over the city
Within a matter of minutes, the storm had blocked out the sun, creating chaos on the city streets

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Within a matter of minutes, the storm had blocked out the sun, creating chaos on the city streets
A raging sand storm sweeps in on the city of Golmud in north west China, where 200,000 people live

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A raging sand storm sweeps in on the city of Golmud in north west China, where 200,000 people live
The sandstorm was the fourth to hit the area this year as authorities struggle to deal with the natural hazards

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The sandstorm was the fourth to hit the area this year as authorities struggle to deal with the natural hazards
China's Meteorlogical Centre issued a blue alert as the sandstorms swept across the north of the country

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China's Meteorlogical Centre issued a blue alert as the sandstorms swept across the north of the country
Golmud was left covered in a remarkable red haze when the sand cloud blew across the city

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Golmud was left covered in a remarkable red haze when the sand cloud blew across the city
The footage of the dust storm in Belarus, filmed from a high rise apartment, shows traffic moving along a busy street in the province of Salihorsk, south of the capital of Minsk on Monday afternoon.
As dark clouds move over the city, the entire area is plunged into darkness - forcing motorists to turn on their lights as they navigate the darkened roads.

The storm was caused by a cold front moving in from the Ukrainian-Belorusian border, reported RT. 
Earlier this month Britain was shrouded in a cloud of Saharan dust, known as 'blood rain,' as the temperatures soared. 
Blurred: The Shard, one of London's most iconic buildings, is pictured shrouded in 'blood rain' earlier this month

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Blurred: The Shard, one of London's most iconic buildings, is pictured shrouded in 'blood rain' earlier this month
In December a small town in Queensland, Australia, experienced a dust storm (pictured) that residents said was unprecedented in magnitude 

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In December a small town in Queensland, Australia, experienced a dust storm (pictured) that residents said was unprecedented in magnitude 
Dr Steven Godby, a geographer researching the effects of blown sand and dust at Nottingham Trent University, explained how these events can occur. 
'The dust is produced from source areas in North Africa, incorporated into a northerly airflow and can travel long distances before being deposited as far away as the UK.
'However, the events we experience are small scale compared to those experienced closer to major dust sources. 
And incredible pictures also taken at the beginning of April showed the moment ferocious red sandstorms devoured a city in China's north west.
China's pollution hit cities are now having to cope with a fresh nuisance - the massive sandstorm that struck the north-west of the country being the fourth this year alone.
The images show the city of Golmud, in the country's north west Qinghai Province, as it succumbs to a sweeping half-hour sandstorm which reduced the visibility to as little as 30 metres, according to The People's Daily Online.
On April 1 a sandstorm could be seen enveloping much of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates

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On April 1 a sandstorm could be seen enveloping much of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates
By April 4, it was beginning to stretch across the Arabia Sea towards Pakistan and India

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By April 4, it was beginning to stretch across the Arabia Sea towards Pakistan and India
China's National Meteorological Centre (NMC) issued a blue alert for the sandstorms.
The red sand swept across the northern part of the country bringing strong winds and floating sand to the regions of Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, Gansu, Ningxia and Shaanxi. 
The organisation advised residents to stay indoors and local authorities to brace for the clean-up operation after the sandstorms.
China's four-tier colour-coded weather warning system signifies red as the most severe followed by orange, yellow and blue.
Photos of the city of Dunhuang in the north-western province of Gansu show the thick orange haze coating the city's atmosphere and the lack of people on the streets gave the area an almost alien planet appearance.
A local meteorologist said visibility was reduced to less than 50metres in downtown areas.
In December a small town in Queensland, Australia, experienced a dust storm that residents said was unprecedented in magnitude.
Clouds of dirt engulfed the town of Bedourie, in Queensland's south-west, bringing with it a thick, dusty night for more than 90 minutes. 
The Middle East has also experienced several huge sandstorms this year.
This week Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran experienced severe dust storms and last week the Arabian Peninsula was hit by a sandstorm the size of the U.S.
And in February raging sandstorms engulfed Israel, Palestine, Lebanon and Egypt causing the worst Israeli air pollution in years and whipping up huge waves in the Mediterranean Sea. 
The sandstorm hit Egypt after unusually warm and sunny weather for a February day, and the sky over downtown Cairo turned yellow and blotted out the sun, limiting visibility

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The sandstorm hit Egypt after unusually warm and sunny weather for a February day, and the sky over downtown Cairo turned yellow and blotted out the sun, limiting visibility
Hazy:Th

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Hazy: The Egyptian capital was transformed by the sandstorm while Alexandria and nearby Dekheila ports were closed because of the weather
Egypt's second-busiest airport outside of the city of Alexandria was closed to arrivals and departures, and flights were diverted to other airports unaffected by the storm

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Red alert: The sandstorm in Egypt gave the country a Martian look
The storm, made up of accumulated dust carried from the far reaches of the Sahara Desert in North Africa also engulfed Cairo.
Israel's Environmental Protection Ministry said air pollution levels were the country's worst in five years. 
The sandstorm that engulfed the Arabian Peninsula, meanwhile, wrecked havoc across the area, causing traffic accidents, the cancellation of hundreds of flights and triggering breathing difficulties among residents.
Images showed the vast sandstorm sweeping its way across Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates and reaching as far east as India and Pakistan over a period of seven days.
It began on April 1, when high winds whipped up the sandstorm in northern Saudi Arabia before it consolidated and began moving southeastward across the peninsula to eventually cover an area almost as large as the United States, Discover Magazine reported.
Along the way it caused chaos across the area's major cities including Riyadh and Dubai, where some locations were reduced to zero visibility, streets turned a shade of orange and schools were forced shut.
The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies said: 'The blowing sand reduced surface visibility to near zero at some locations, disrupting ground transportation, air traffic, and also closing schools.

WHY DUST STORM CHAOS IS SET TO GET EVEN WORSE 

Dr Emilio Cuevas-Agulló, director of the Izana Atmospheric Research Center in Tenerife, Spain, told MailOnline that while it was difficult to say if there have been an increase in dust storms generally, population and urban growth in desert regions means an increased risk of people being affected by them.
He said: ‘We are more aware of the problem since we have much better monitoring, mainly from satellites, and forecast systems, in the last five to 10 years, and because the population growth and corresponding infrastructures increase in desert and arid regions, in recent decades, increasing vulnerability to the same dust episodes.’
He added: ‘Our longest dust records over the North Atlantic, downwind from the Sahara desert, which started in late 1970s show a great inter-annual variability and decadal changes, but we don't really see positive trends.’
Severely reduced viability caused traffic chaos in Egypt's capital city

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Severely reduced viability caused traffic chaos in Egypt's capital city
'Visibility was reduced to 0.1 mile for several hours at Dubai International Airport, which is one of the world’s busiest in terms of volume of flights.'
More than 450 Saudi Arabian Airlines flights were cancelled between across three days which equalled 33 per cent of the carrier's 1,526 scheduled flights, the Saudi Gazette reported.
On top of this, 678 flights were delayed and another 19 rerouted from airports in Jeddah, Riyadh and Dammam. 
Dr Emilio Cuevas-Agulló, director of the Izana Atmospheric Research Center in Tenerife, Spain, told MailOnline that while it was difficult to say if there have been an increase in dust storms generally, population and urban growth in desert regions means an increased risk of people being affected by them.
He said: ‘We are more aware of the problem since we have much better monitoring, mainly from satellites, and forecast systems, in the last five to 10 years, and because the population growth and corresponding infrastructures increase in desert and arid regions, in recent decades, increasing vulnerability to the same dust episodes.’
He added: ‘Our longest dust records over the North Atlantic, downwind from the Sahara desert, which started in late 1970s show a great inter-annual variability and decadal changes, but we don't really see positive trends.’
A Nasa study said: 'Approximately half of the dust in today's atmosphere may be the result of changes to the environment caused by human activity, including agriculture, overgrazing, and the cutting down of forests.'

Posted: 25 Apr 2015 06:51 PM PDT




Excerpt from cnn.com

Kathmandu, Nepal (CNN)Rescue crews and residents in Nepal early Sunday began the desperate search for survivors after a magnitude-7.8 quake near the capital of Kathmandu a day earlier flattened homes, buildings and temples, causing widespread damage across the region and killing more than 1,400 people.
Whole streets and squares in the capital of roughly 1 million people were covered in rubble. Stunned residents stared at temples that were once part of their daily lives and now were reduced to nothing. 
Locals and tourists ferreted through mounds of debris in search of survivors. Cheers rose from the piles when people were found alive -- but mostly bodies turned up. The injured ended up being treated outside overflowing hospitals, where crowds of people gathered looking for relatives. 
Dozens of bodies were pulled from the nine-story Dharahara tower that came crashing down during the quake. At least 13 people were killed on Mount Everest, where the quake caused multiple avalanches. 
A seemingly endless series of aftershocks continued to roil the area, further traumatizing survivors. Residents huddled in the cold rain overnight for safety.
And the death toll of 1,457 is expected to rise as the full extent of the damage is assessed. 
The loss of life reported so far "is really based on the information we have from the main cities," Lex Kassenberg, Nepal country director for CARE International, told CNN. "But if you look at the spread of the earthquake a lot of the rural areas have been hit as well. The information we received from the field is that 80% of the houses in these rural areas have been destroyed."



VIDEO

 

Death toll likely to rise

An estimated 4.6 million people in the region were exposed to tremors from the Nepal earthquake, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said via Twitter. Thirty out of 75 districts were affected by the quake.
In neighboring Tibet, roads buckled, buildings collapsed and at least 13 people were killed, China's state media reported, citing local authorities.
Separately, at least four Chinese citizens in Nepal -- two workers with a Chinese company, a tourist and a mountaineer -- have been killed, state media reported, citing the Chinese Embassy in Kathmandu.
Officials in India confirmed at least 34 deaths in three states from the Nepal quake.
The quake struck Saturday at 11:56 a.m. local time (2:11 a.m. ET) and was centered less than 50 miles northwest of Kathmandu. It occurred at a depth of 9.3 miles, which is considered shallow and more damaging than a deeper quake. It was reported by people in the area as having lasted a long time. One person said he felt as if he were on a ship in rough seas.




Kathmandu, which sits in a valley surrounded by the Himalayas, has a population of about 1 million.

Siobhan Heanue, a reporter with ABC News Australia, told CNN she was wandering at an ancient temple complex at the moment of the earthquake. Several temples collapsed around her, she said. 
"It's not too often you find yourself in a situation where you have to run for your life," Heanue said, adding that she sought shelter under the table of a cafe. "It was utterly terrifying and, of course, the screams and the chaos of people scrambling for shelter around me in utter confusion and despair."

Devastating loss of people, history

She watched as residents picked through the rubble of a destroyed temple. 

"Unfortunately, that search was not fruitful," Heanue said. "There were 12 bodies at least pulled from the rubble in the square. This was just one of several historical temple complexes severely affected by the earthquake."

Dr. Dietric Hennings, a Tulane University surgeon who happened to be in Kathmandu on a humanitarian mission, said he treated people at his hotel. He expected to see patients at a hospital emergency room as soon as the U.S. Embassy gave its approval.
"The largest thing in this situation is crush injuries, people with complex fractures of their limbs," he said. "The worst-case scenario in this situation is amputations. The injuries we've treated so far are lacerations from broken glass."
Thomas Nybo, a freelance photographer, was sitting in a coffee shop in Kathmandu's Temal district. It appeared to be a minor tremor at first but gradually gained intensity, he told CNN.
Thousands poured onto the streets of the densely populated tourist hub.

"This region is no stranger to earthquakes," he said. "A lot of people had the same feeling: This is a tremor, it passed. When that wasn't the case, they were in uncharted territory... It's basically an unwritten book."
Outside the coffee shop in Temal, Nybo said he saw a group of women gather near what had been a six-story building. One woman said children were trapped beneath rubble. 
"We ran over and ran around the rubble and couldn't hear anything," he said. "There was no chance that they survived."
Nearby, another building had come down on an area where locals went to do laundry and collect water, Nybo said. A voice was heard coming from the rubble. 
"A group of mainly tourists started gathering rocks, hammers and pickaxes and breaking through a re-enforced concrete wall to reach this guy... It took about two hours of smashing through wall and cutting rebar with a hacksaw to pull him out alive." 
Two bodies were found near the spot where the man was rescued, Nybo said. Not far away, the bodies of three or four women were uncovered. 
"Who knows how many other bodies lie beneath the rubble?" he said.
Nybo said soldiers did not appear on the streets until about two hours after the quake. 
"It's really hard to get a sense of any kind of emergency response," he said. 
The streets of Kathmandu were packed with thousands of locals and tourists who refuse to go back to their homes or hotels because of recurring aftershocks.
Denis McClean, spokesman for the U.N. Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, told CNN that weak building codes in Nepal contributed to the amount of structural damage.
"Building codes in Kathmandu itself have not been well upheld in recent years," he said. "Efforts have been made over the last few years to strengthen these building codes but, unfortunately, this comes too late for the many thousands of buildings that have gone up across the Kathmandu Valley over the last 20 years that did not adhere to the building codes."

People 'shaken, upset, crying'

Rob Stiles and his wife had just checked into a hotel in Kathmandu when the earthquake struck.
"It felt like it went on forever," the California resident said.
Outside, people were running onto the street, with the temblor knocking some off their feet. A huge section of a brick wall crushed motorcycles and a car, he said. 
Later, as they walked around the city, an aftershock hit.
"People were screaming and looking around," he said. "There were people clearly shaken, upset, crying." 
Chitra Thapa, 48, a CNN security guard in Atlanta, said he spoke by telephone with relatives in Kathmandu and Pokhara, a city about 200 kilometers (125 miles) west of the capital. They were fine and were staying on streets. 
"Everybody's in shock," he said. "They never felt an earthquake that big."
He said his brother-in-law was helping in the search for survivors.
His daughter Kushum, 21, said she talked by via the Internet with relatives and friends spending the night in the cold rain. Strangers were handing out blankets and sharing food that they retrieved from their homes, she said. 
"When I heard the news," she said, "I just want to go home now. I want to help."

'Now there is no next time'

Kushum Thapa said she lived and studied in Kathmandu. She said she put off climbing Dharahara tower because of a fear of heights but thought that one day she would attempt it. 
"I will go next time," she recalled thinking to herself. "Now there there no next time." 
Aid agencies expressed concern for the welfare of survivors in the coming days, as overnight temperatures were expected to drop and people were forced to make do without electricity, running water and shelter.
The international community must react quickly to save lives -- particularly those of children -- said Devendra Tak, of the aid agency Save the Children.
"With every minute the situation becomes worse," he said. "Tonight is going to be a very tough night out there for people in Kathmandu and for people in the surrounding villages."
Food, clothing and medicine will be urgently required, he said.
The U.S. government is providing $1 million in immediate assistance to Nepal, the U.S. Embassy in Nepal said. American disaster response teams are also on their way to Nepal, the Embassy said via Twitter.
"To the people in Nepal and the region affected by this tragedy we send our heartfelt sympathies," Secretary of State John Kerry said in a statement. "The United States stands with you during this difficult time.
Those who faced spending the night outside already had endured a day that was difficult beyond belief. People who experienced the quake spoke by telephone with CNN, describing scenes of chaos, fear and suffering. 
CNN's Manesh Shrestha said he saw five bodies at a hospital to which he walked to seek treatment for his own injuries. People with severe injuries were lying outside, with doctors administering CPR to at least one of them, Shrestha said.

"It's quite chaotic," he said by phone. "People are wailing, crying."
Shrestha, who had been cut and was in need of stitches, was turned away because other people had more dire need of care. He saw people lying outside with broken bones and head injuries.


Not far away, deadly avalanches triggered by the quake thundered down Mount Everest, sending mountaineers running for cover.
At least 13 bodies have been evacuated from Everest base camp on Saturday. The Indian Army's Everest Expedition evacuated the bodies of the foreign mountaineers who were preparing for the summit, said Indian army spokesman Col. Rohan Anand.

Dr. Nima Namgyal, a doctor with a leading expedition on an Everest base camp, told CNN he had seen 14 dead bodies so far and that they are mainly foreign nationals. 
"Everest base camp huge earthquake then huge avalanche from Pumori," Twitter user Alex Gavan said, referring to one of the mountains on the Nepal-tibet border. "Running for life from my tent. Unhurt. Many many people up the mountain."
Everest and the many other mountains in the region draw hikers from around the world. From social media posts and eyewitness accounts, it became evident that these trails and base camps got hit hard by the quake and the havoc it caused.

The U.S. Geological Survey had at first measured the strength at magnitude 7.5 but later upgraded it. A strong aftershock of magnitude 6.6 was recorded a little more than a half-hour afterward, along with at least 15 aftershocks of magnitude 4.5 or greater, the USGS reported. 
One witness told CNN by phone that people had gathered outdoors in fear. Another said via Facebook that people were listening for news on their car radios.
"We are scared and waiting for the tremors to end," Shiwani Neupane said on Facebook chat from Kathmandu. "We are all sitting outside because there is more news of another quake.
"There is no power and families are listening to the FM radio inside their cars," Neupane said. "News of multiple building collapses.
I've seen many cracked walls and roads and buildings. The (Dharahara, a landmark tower in Kathmandu) was packed with people a while ago. There are police everywhere trying to move rubble to make space on the roads for ambulances. Everyone is very scared."
Heanue said at least 50 bodies from pulled from the ruins of Dharahara.

People experienced quake as 'severe' to 'violent'

The force of the quake was said by people who contacted the USGS to be from "severe" to "violent," nearly the highest rating on the intensity scale. Tremors were felt as far as New Delhi, more than 200 miles away in neighboring India. An official said they were felt there at magnitude 5.0.

The shaking was rated as "strong" to "severe" on the USGS ShakeMap. CNN sister network CNN-IBN reported that roads in the area were out.
Kanak Masni, a journalist in Kathmandu, told CNN by phone that Dharahara -- also known as the Bhimsen Tower -- had tumbled down. The building, built in 1832, was more than 60 meters (200 feet) tall and provided visitors with a panoramic view of of the Kathmandu Valley.

Masni told CNN by telephone that this appeared to be "the most massive earthquake to hit central Nepal since 1934." In that quake, which was 8.1 magnitude and centered near Mount Everest, more than 10,000 people were killed.

IBN reporter K. Dhiksit looked out his window in Kathmandu and saw the collapsed walls of many buildings. As he watched, an aftershock rattled the street. He heard "big booming sounds," he said, and saw people fleeing into the streets.

Photos of caved-in and toppled buildings appeared on social media.
India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in a tweet, "We are in the process of finding more information and are working to reach out to those affected, both at home & in Nepal."
Posted: 25 Apr 2015 06:39 PM PDT





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Galaxy NGC 1300


Posted: 25 Apr 2015 06:21 PM PDT






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To Gregg,

Resultado de imagem para thank you roses images

For all these years of Friendship,
Guidance and Enlightment.

Ascension Earth 2012

Farewell from Ascension Earth!

I would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to each and every one of you for visiting Ascension Earth over the past few years and making this site, what I consider, such a wonderful and very surprising success since my first post way back in January of 2011. I never dreamed this site would receive just shy of 10 million page views since then, and I want to thank you all again for stopping in from time to time for a visit. I hope you have found some of the content interesting as well as educational, and I want everyone to know that I only shared content I believed to be factual at the time of publication, though I may have reached differing understandingsconcerning some of the subject matter as time has past. All of the content that has been shared here at Ascension Earth was shared with the goal of provoking contemplation and conversation, leading to a raising of consciousness, an ascension of consciousness. That's what ascension is to me.

I have made a decision to move on from here, but I will always remember and always cherish the friendships I have made along this twisting journey since launching this site, what feels like a lifetime ago now. I wish all of you the greatest success in each and every endeavor you shall undertake, and I hope each of you are graced with peace, love & light every step of the way as you continue your never ending journey through this incredibly breathtaking and ever mysterious universe we share together.

Greg

Morgan Kochel says:

Conversation with
A Man Who Went to Mars
by Morgan Kochel

…And there you have it! This was the end of our discussion about the Mars mission, but I have remained in touch with Chad. At this point, I hope to be able to convince him to do a video or TV interview, but of course, there will be more than a few obstacles to overcome, the main one being that he may currently be in some danger if he goes public.

Furthermore, there is always the barrier of peoples' understandable skepticism.

As I said in the beginning, I cannot verify this story for anyone, nor is my intent to convince anyone of its veracity. My goal is only to help him get his story heard, because if this story IS true, the people of this planet are being lied to on a grand scale, and perhaps this will eventually help the UFO Disclosure Movement. It's time for the lies to be uncovered, and time for the truth -- whatever that may be -- to be known once and for all.

a man

esoteric



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Please Sign Disclosure Petition VI - the Citizen Hearing

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